This technology stock is thriving during the coronavirus crisis



Canada has a new top tech company and it’s nearly impossible to put a value on


itCanada’s tech sector has a new top dog.A meteoric rise in Shopify Inc. shares in recent weeks has made the Ottawa-based e-commerce giant the single largest IT listing in the country, a titlepreviously held by home-grown champions of technology past and present,including Nortel Networks Corp., BlackBerry Ltd. predecessor Research inMotion Ltd, and, most recently, CGI Group Inc.With a $24.7-billion market capitalization, Shopify finds itself atop Canada’stech sector at a pivotal stage in its evolution.Story continues below advertisementQuestions linger from a 2017 short-seller attack over Shopify’s businessmodel, competitive threats are rising and profitability is still provingelusive. But the market still expects nothing less than explosive growth, saidBrian Madden, a portfolio manager at Goodreid Investment Counsel Inc.“When you’re a smaller company, it’s achievable to grow at a triple-digit orhigh double-digit pace for a few years. Now, that they’re at $1-billion inrevenue, that growth is much more difficult,” Mr. Madden said.Shopify is expected to post its first 10-figure annual sales total when itreports fourth-quarter financial performance on Feb. 12.Over the past five years, the company’s revenue has risen tenfold, which isjust the kind of growth the market has been happy to handsomely reward.After a shaky start to its life as a publicly traded company in 2015, Shopifywas eventually swept up in the frenzy for U.S. tech stocks, as investorsclambered for exposure to the high-growth FAANG stocks − Facebook Inc, Apple,Amazon.com Inc, Netflix Inc and Google-parent Alphabet Inc. − and their peers.Over two years up to mid-2018, Shopify’s stock rose from about $38 a share tonearly $230, or 500 per cent over 500 trading days.One of the few interruptions to that upward trajectory came in October, 2017,when well-known U.S. short-seller Andrew Left suggested that Shopify wasconcealing a high rate of churn in its customer base, calling the company a“good ol’ get-rich-quick scheme.”Story continues below advertisementWhile the dip in Shopify’s shares proved temporary, the report raised somevalid concerns about whether the company can sustain its growth, Mr. Maddensaid.“The implication was that they’re having to constantly replace customers, andthe treadmill just moves faster and faster as the company gets bigger.”Like most growth stocks, fair value for Shopify is an elusive concept. Thecompany has yet to register a profitable quarter on a GAAP (generally acceptedaccounting principles) basis, while an adjusted net income of about 31 cents ashare is expected for fiscal 2018, according to Bloomberg data.At a current share price of more than $223, that results in astronomicalvaluations by the most common metrics. “It’s very difficult to assign a valueto that, so you get this tug of war in terms of price discovery,” said Jasondel Vicario, a portfolio manager at HollisWealth, a division of IndustrialAlliance Securities.Over the past year, Shopify’s stock has been highly volatile, trading as lowas $147 and as high as $230.Of course, the tech-sector selloff and the late-year correction had much to dowith that, as Shopify was punished alongside other growth stocks.Story continues below advertisementAs the market subsequently stormed back with the best month of January for theS&P 500 index since 1987, Shopify caught the updraft, rising by 38 per centfrom its Dec. 24 low.It was that leg up that saw Shopify become the largest tech stock on theToronto Stock Exchange.And until proven otherwise, Shopify is in a class of its own when it comes tothe thinly populated Canadian tech sector, Mr. Madden said.“If you’re looking for raw, rapid, organic growth in new and rapidly growingmarkets, Shopify is your horse.”2 TSX Tech Stocks That Pay Killer Dividends!TSX tech stocks continue to outperform the broader market in 2020. Whileeveryone likes the hot growth from technology stocks, an elite few also payvery attractive dividends.

Why own dividend-paying tech stocks?


These stocks are attractive for a few reasons. First, dividend-paying techcompanies must be disciplined in how they allocate capital. As they pay adistribution to shareholders, they simply can’t afford to waste money onpoorly-thought investments or acquisitions.Second, it generally demonstrates that the business model is stable and solid.You can only pay a dividend if you have a strong sight-line for cash flows.Third, these tech stocks have a holistic plan to reward shareholders. Whilekiller-revenue growth is awesome, at some point investors need earningstangible accretion on their capital investment. The only way to keep themarket happy over the long term is to steadily keep growing earnings and cashflows.

This technology stock is thriving during the coronavirus crisis


That said, the first dividend-paying technology stock is Calian (TSX:CGY).Although the stock is up 30% year-to-date, Calian still yields an attractive2.5%.Calian has a diversified business that provides solutions for public andprivate enterprises in the defence, education, healthcare, communications, andgovernment sectors. Last week, Calian enjoyed its seventh consecutive quarterof record revenue growth.Year-over-year, adjusted EBITDA and net profit increased 55% and 36%,respectively. Its largest business segments, Advanced Technologies, Health,and InfoTech saw organic revenues increase 67%, 16%, and 7%, respectively. Thecompany year-to-date has posted over $160 million of new contracts to itsbacklog.Calian’s diverse business is proving to be incredibly resilient, even in theCOVID-19 crisis. Calian has no debt and has $33 million of cash. It providesessential services that are vital in crisis environments (i.e., emergencymanagement solutions, health services, cyber security), so 2020 could actuallybe a strong year.Management affirmed its 2020 guidance, despite some dilution from a recentshare offering. This diversified tech stock is well equipped to excel in theCOVID-19 environment. Not only should Calian thrive now, but it has a strongfoundation to expand as the world normalizes.

This stock has got a solid growth platform


Sylogist (TSXV:SYZ) is a slightly less “growthy” tech stock. Even still, it’sup 13% year to date and is beating the TSX by a nice margin. Sylogist is aprovider of cloud-based Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solutions forpublic organizations, non-profits, NGOs, and school divisions.This tech stock has consistently been pumping out a nice, growing ~4%dividend. In fact, since 2015, Sylogist has grown its dividend by almost 60%.It just increased the dividend again by 10% in its second quarter!Additionally, 80% of revenues are derived from subscriptions and maintenance,so the company has a very consistent, stable revenue stream. The year 2019 wasa bit of a flat year for the company due to restructuring and other one-timecosts. Yet, in 2020, it is beginning to gain traction with some new products,services, and even a small acquisition.In Q2, Sylogist saw gross profit margins rise 2 percentage points to 75%.Adjusted EBITDA margins increased to 60%, and adjusted EBITDA increased 34% toa record $5.6 million.Like Calian, it is cash-rich ($44 million) and debt-free. This tech stockoperates very efficiently and has very little fixed costs, so it produces asignificant amount of free cash flow. The company’s long-time CEO will beleaving this year.As a result, Sylogist has undertaken a strategic review process. I believethis could potentially open up a new aggressive growth strategy or possiblylead to a take-over offer. Either way, the stock is probably going to do verywell over the long term.

Get rewarded now and over your lifetime


These are two very solid, cash-rich tech stocks that pay safe, consistentdividends and have potential for a life-time of capital gains. Theirconsistent, long-term potential makes them great picks for your TFSA or RRSPaccount!This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the“official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium service oradvisor. We’re Motley! Questioning an investing thesis — even one of our own —helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help usbecome smarter, happier, and richer, so we sometimes publish articles that maynot be in line with recommendations, rankings or other content.These tech stocks were the biggest winners and losers in the Seattle area for2019(Photo via Tiffany Lieu/Avalara)Microsoft and Amazon are the centerpieces of Seattle’s booming tech scene, and2019 was a big year for both of them. Microsoft eclipsed a marketcapitalization of $1 trillion and spent much of the year as the nation’s mostvaluable company. Amazon continued its ongoing disruption of retail; dominanceof cloud computing; and attempts to push the boundaries of shipping andlogistics.But neither of these giants had the best year on Wall Street among Seattletech companies. That distinction belongs to Avalara, the tax automationsoftware company that went public in June 2018 and saw its stock rise morethan 125 percent this year.GeekWire examined 2019 stock changes of 34 public tech and biotech companieseither based in the Seattle or with a huge presence in the region, bringingbig names like Apple, Google, Facebook and Twitter into the conversation.Microsoft, with 55 percent stock growth in 2019, finished with the 10th-highest rise among the companies. Amazon finished with the third-lowest stockgrowth among any company that gained in 2019, with shares rising just over 20percent.Among the biggest gainers was a group of enterprise software companies thatwent public in 2018: Avalara, Smartsheet and DocuSign.Click here for a full-size version of the chart.It was a strong year on Wall Street overall as the Nasdaq and New York StockExchange saw growth of 35 and 22 percent respectively. Despite the increasedscrutiny on the tech industry this year, 25 of the 34 stocks we looked atoutpaced gains on the stock markets as a whole.Huge companies like Uber, Lyft, Zoom, Slack, Spotify and others went public in2019. However, only two Seattle-area tech or biotech companies had an IPO thisyear: Adaptive Biotechnologies and Limeade.Shares in Adaptive, which is working with Microsoft to develop a universalblood test to diagnose multiple diseases, spiked 90 percent on day one oftrading. However, the stock has since declined nearly 30 percent.Limeade, an employee experience software company based in the Seattle area,went public on the Australian Stock Exchange with just a few trading daysremaining in the year, so we left them out of our analysis.At least three Seattle-area companies exited the public markets this year:Alder Biopharmaceuticals, Cray and Immune Design.Here are a few notable gainers in 2019:Avalara | $73.25 per share | 127 percent year-over-year growth: The sales taxautomation company continued to build momentum this year from the U.S. SupremeCourt’s Wayfair 2018 decision allowing states to collect sales tax from onlinesellers even if those companies don’t have a physical presence in the state.Avalara beat Wall Street expectations in each of the first three quarters in2019, posting rapid revenue growth and narrowing losses a little more than ayear after going public. The company reached more than 25,000 overallcustomers last year.Seattle Genetics | $112.55 per share | 96 percent year-over-year growth: Thecancer drug maker topped Seattle’s growing cadre of biotech companies in stockgrowth in 2019.In October, Seattle Genetics’ stock spiked after the company showed positiveresults for a new drug that fights aggressive breast cancers. A trial of thedrug tucatinib delivered better results in combination with two other cancerdrugs than those drugs alone. Overall, tucatinib reduced the risk of canceradvancement by 46 percent and the risk of death by 34 percent.Apple’s Kristina Raspe, Seattle Chamber of Commerce CEO Marilyn Strickland,and Mayor Jenny Durkan speak at Apple’s new Seattle campus. (GeekWire Photo /Monica Nickelsburg)Apple | $293.65 per share | 86 percent year-over-year growth: Apple plantedits flag in Seattle in 2019, scooping up a huge new office complex in Amazon’sbackyard. The tech giant pledged to grow to 2,000 employees in Seattle afterleasing two 12-story office towers totaling 630,000 square feet at 333 Dexter.Apple broke a streak of declining revenue earlier this year, thanks to growthfrom its emerging services arm overshadowing its stagnant hardware division.In September, the company debuted the latest generation of iPhone, iPad, AppleWatch, and in the following months launched the Apple TV+ streaming serviceand the Apple Arcade gaming service.Smartsheet | $44.92 per share | 86 percent year-over-year growth: The workmanagement company made the second and third acquisitions in its history in2019, part of a busy year that saw Smartsheet shares continue to rise.Smartsheet delivered strong financial results in the first three quarters ofthe year, with revenue growth topping 53 percent in each period. Smartsheet ismoving deeper into government services to expand its customer base, launchinga new tool earlier this year that allows government agencies to collaborateand manage their workflows.And here are a few of the companies that are ready to move on from a toughyear and start fresh in 2020:Players from the Sounders and Reign, Seattle’s two pro soccer clubs, show offtheir new jersey sponsor, e-commerce company Zulily. (GeekWire Photo / KevinLisota)Qurate Retail Group | $8.43 per share | 57 percent year-over-year decline:Zulily became more well-known in the Seattle area last year after it took overfor Microsoft as the new jersey sponsor for the Seattle Sounders and Reign FC.However, shrinking revenue from the online retailer has played a part in atough year for its parent company Qurate Retail Group.In the second quarter, Zulily revenue dropped 13 percent to $363 million, thelargest year-over-year dip since the company was acquired by QVC parent Quratein 2015. A week prior, the Zulily made cut an undisclosed number of jobs asCEO Jeff Yurcisin said the company was at “a critical inflection point” thatrequired changes to the business.F5 Networks | $139.65 per share | 13 percent year-over-year decline: Thecompany, which focuses primarily on helping its customers build, manage andsecure their business applications, was busy in 2019 as it continues a years-long transition. F5 is adjusting from making hardware to serve customersrunning data centers to focusing on software for customers running on publiccloud infrastructure from providers like Amazon, Microsoft and Google. Plus,F5 is embracing subscriptions as the main method to deliver its products.In 2019, F5 acquired popular web server NGINX for $670 million in March, andfollowed that up with an even bigger acquisition: a $1 billion deal for ShapeSecurity, a Santa Clara, Calif.-based company that sells a fraud preventionplatform to banks, airlines, retailers, government agencies, and more. InOctober, F5 announced a new alliance with Amazon Web Services to unite salesteams from the two Seattle tech giants and open the door for future technologyintegrations.Expedia Group’s new Seattle campus. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)Expedia Group | $108.14 per share | 3 percent year-over-year decline: Sharesin the travel giant tanked in October after the company missed profitexpectations in the third quarter, in the face of growing competition fromGoogle. Expedia stock was up 21 percent for the year until that day, but theresulting fallout of its earnings miss dragged shares into the red for theyear.Expedia employees started moving into the company’s new headquarters inOctober, more than four years after the company announced plans to trade inits downtown Bellevue, Wash. high rise HQ for a huge campus on Seattle’swaterfront. The company solved legal disputes with Ryanair and UnitedAirlines, hoping to solidify its position in online booking.These tech stocks were the biggest winners and losers in the Seattle area for2019(Photo via Tiffany Lieu/Avalara)Microsoft and Amazon are the centerpieces of Seattle’s booming tech scene, and2019 was a big year for both of them. Microsoft eclipsed a marketcapitalization of $1 trillion and spent much of the year as the nation’s mostvaluable company. Amazon continued its ongoing disruption of retail; dominanceof cloud computing; and attempts to push the boundaries of shipping andlogistics.But neither of these giants had the best year on Wall Street among Seattletech companies. That distinction belongs to Avalara, the tax automationsoftware company that went public in June 2018 and saw its stock rise morethan 125 percent this year.GeekWire examined 2019 stock changes of 34 public tech and biotech companieseither based in the Seattle or with a huge presence in the region, bringingbig names like Apple, Google, Facebook and Twitter into the conversation.Microsoft, with 55 percent stock growth in 2019, finished with the 10th-highest rise among the companies. Amazon finished with the third-lowest stockgrowth among any company that gained in 2019, with shares rising just over 20percent.Among the biggest gainers was a group of enterprise software companies thatwent public in 2018: Avalara, Smartsheet and DocuSign.Click here for a full-size version of the chart.It was a strong year on Wall Street overall as the Nasdaq and New York StockExchange saw growth of 35 and 22 percent respectively. Despite the increasedscrutiny on the tech industry this year, 25 of the 34 stocks we looked atoutpaced gains on the stock markets as a whole.Huge companies like Uber, Lyft, Zoom, Slack, Spotify and others went public in2019. However, only two Seattle-area tech or biotech companies had an IPO thisyear: Adaptive Biotechnologies and Limeade.Shares in Adaptive, which is working with Microsoft to develop a universalblood test to diagnose multiple diseases, spiked 90 percent on day one oftrading. However, the stock has since declined nearly 30 percent.Limeade, an employee experience software company based in the Seattle area,went public on the Australian Stock Exchange with just a few trading daysremaining in the year, so we left them out of our analysis.At least three Seattle-area companies exited the public markets this year:Alder Biopharmaceuticals, Cray and Immune Design.Here are a few notable gainers in 2019:Avalara | $73.25 per share | 127 percent year-over-year growth: The sales taxautomation company continued to build momentum this year from the U.S. SupremeCourt’s Wayfair 2018 decision allowing states to collect sales tax from onlinesellers even if those companies don’t have a physical presence in the state.Avalara beat Wall Street expectations in each of the first three quarters in2019, posting rapid revenue growth and narrowing losses a little more than ayear after going public. The company reached more than 25,000 overallcustomers last year.Seattle Genetics | $112.55 per share | 96 percent year-over-year growth: Thecancer drug maker topped Seattle’s growing cadre of biotech companies in stockgrowth in 2019.In October, Seattle Genetics’ stock spiked after the company showed positiveresults for a new drug that fights aggressive breast cancers. A trial of thedrug tucatinib delivered better results in combination with two other cancerdrugs than those drugs alone. Overall, tucatinib reduced the risk of canceradvancement by 46 percent and the risk of death by 34 percent.Apple’s Kristina Raspe, Seattle Chamber of Commerce CEO Marilyn Strickland,and Mayor Jenny Durkan speak at Apple’s new Seattle campus. (GeekWire Photo /Monica Nickelsburg)Apple | $293.65 per share | 86 percent year-over-year growth: Apple plantedits flag in Seattle in 2019, scooping up a huge new office complex in Amazon’sbackyard. The tech giant pledged to grow to 2,000 employees in Seattle afterleasing two 12-story office towers totaling 630,000 square feet at 333 Dexter.Apple broke a streak of declining revenue earlier this year, thanks to growthfrom its emerging services arm overshadowing its stagnant hardware division.In September, the company debuted the latest generation of iPhone, iPad, AppleWatch, and in the following months launched the Apple TV+ streaming serviceand the Apple Arcade gaming service.Smartsheet | $44.92 per share | 86 percent year-over-year growth: The workmanagement company made the second and third acquisitions in its history in2019, part of a busy year that saw Smartsheet shares continue to rise.Smartsheet delivered strong financial results in the first three quarters ofthe year, with revenue growth topping 53 percent in each period. Smartsheet ismoving deeper into government services to expand its customer base, launchinga new tool earlier this year that allows government agencies to collaborateand manage their workflows.And here are a few of the companies that are ready to move on from a toughyear and start fresh in 2020:Players from the Sounders and Reign, Seattle’s two pro soccer clubs, show offtheir new jersey sponsor, e-commerce company Zulily. (GeekWire Photo / KevinLisota)Qurate Retail Group | $8.43 per share | 57 percent year-over-year decline:Zulily became more well-known in the Seattle area last year after it took overfor Microsoft as the new jersey sponsor for the Seattle Sounders and Reign FC.However, shrinking revenue from the online retailer has played a part in atough year for its parent company Qurate Retail Group.In the second quarter, Zulily revenue dropped 13 percent to $363 million, thelargest year-over-year dip since the company was acquired by QVC parent Quratein 2015. A week prior, the Zulily made cut an undisclosed number of jobs asCEO Jeff Yurcisin said the company was at “a critical inflection point” thatrequired changes to the business.F5 Networks | $139.65 per share | 13 percent year-over-year decline: Thecompany, which focuses primarily on helping its customers build, manage andsecure their business applications, was busy in 2019 as it continues a years-long transition. F5 is adjusting from making hardware to serve customersrunning data centers to focusing on software for customers running on publiccloud infrastructure from providers like Amazon, Microsoft and Google. Plus,F5 is embracing subscriptions as the main method to deliver its products.In 2019, F5 acquired popular web server NGINX for $670 million in March, andfollowed that up with an even bigger acquisition: a $1 billion deal for ShapeSecurity, a Santa Clara, Calif.-based company that sells a fraud preventionplatform to banks, airlines, retailers, government agencies, and more. InOctober, F5 announced a new alliance with Amazon Web Services to unite salesteams from the two Seattle tech giants and open the door for future technologyintegrations.Expedia Group’s new Seattle campus. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)Expedia Group | $108.14 per share | 3 percent year-over-year decline: Sharesin the travel giant tanked in October after the company missed profitexpectations in the third quarter, in the face of growing competition fromGoogle. Expedia stock was up 21 percent for the year until that day, but theresulting fallout of its earnings miss dragged shares into the red for theyear.Expedia employees started moving into the company’s new headquarters inOctober, more than four years after the company announced plans to trade inits downtown Bellevue, Wash. high rise HQ for a huge campus on Seattle’swaterfront. The company solved legal disputes with Ryanair and UnitedAirlines, hoping to solidify its position in online booking.16 Top Tech Stocks for MillennialsWe asked our Foolish analysts to name their top tech stocks for our Millennialaudience. Here are their choices:

Ryan Vanzo: BlackBerry Ltd


If you’re a millennial investor, it doesn’t get much better than BlackBerry(TSX:BB)(NYSE:BB). You may know this tech stock as a smartphone manufacturer,but last year, it didn’t produce a single phone. Today, it’s a pure-play oncybersecurity software.Cybersecurity has never been more important. Every year, the world addsmillions of newly-connected devices. All of these devices need to be protectedfrom hacking. Blackberry makes the software that makes this possible. Its QNXplatform, for example, is already installed in 150 million cars worldwide.Right now, BlackBerry stock trades at 3 times sales. Competitors likeCrowdstrike trade at a 500% premium! Once the market catches onto BlackBerry’snew business model, expect that discount to narrow quickly.Fool contributor Ryan Vanzo has no position in any stocks listed.

Robin Brown: Descartes Systems Inc.


Although Descartes Systems (TSX:DSG)(NASDAQ:DSGX) is a pricey stock today, itis perfect for investors with a long investment horizon. It is a leadingprovider of logistics/supply-chain software, networks, and digital solutions.As global trade increasingly becomes complex, Descartes stands to benefit froma wave of customers seeking to digitize and optimize their logisticsplatforms.Descartes produces very predictable revenues (89% are reoccurring) andaccretes significant free cash flow. It has a $46 million net cash position,which it will likely deploy into accretive acquisitions this year. Betweenacquisitions and organic growth, management targets 10-15% adjusted EBITDAgrowth per year. Compound that over a lifetime and it makes for a pretty sweetCanadian tech stock to own.Fool contributor Robin Brown owns shares of DESCARTES SYS.

Stephanie Bedard-Chateauneuf: Real Matters


Real Matters (TSX:REAL), a provider of network services for the mortgage andinsurance industries, is my top TSX tech stock for Millennials.The bulk of Real Matters’ revenues comes from the U.S. mortgage industry. Thecloud-based real estate platform benefits from tailwinds in refinance and homepurchases volumes in the current context of low rates.The combination of low rates, higher volumes, and market share gains givesReal Matters a great risk-reward profile. Revenue is expected to rise by 44%in 2020, while earnings are estimated to grow by 117%.With a five-year PEG of 0.65, Real Matters’ stock is cheap given its growthprofile.Fool contributor Stephanie Bedard-Chateauneuf owns no position in any stockmentioned.

Vishesh Raisinghani: Absolute Software


Just like any other millennial in his late-20’s, what matters to me most iswealth creation. In my opinion, the best way to create wealth is to invest ina company that’s at the epicenter of a wave of relentless demand. AbsoluteSoftware (TSX:ABT) fits that bill perfectly. The company provides endpointsecurity software that allows corporations to secure a range of consumerdevices, from smartphones to laptops. In the work-from-home era, this serviceis as critical as ever.I believe Absolute’s platform will be adopted by more corporations of allsizes in the years ahead. Meanwhile, the stock is trading at 30 times cashflow per share and offers a 2.3% dividend yield. An attractively priced growthopportunity.Fool contributor Vishesh Raisinghani has no position in any of the stocksmentioned.

Karen Thomas: Evertz Technologies Ltd.


Evertz Technologies (TSX:ET) is a little-known quality tech stock that has astrong history of shareholder value creation. Evertz designs, manufactures,and markets video and audio infrastructure solutions for the broadcastingindustry. It is a business that has both consistent and reliable results, aswell as good growth ahead.The broadcast equipment market is experiencing a secular shift that is beingfueled by the following factors: The transition from analog to digital,growing demand worldwide for HDTV, government mandate for digital, and thefact that broadcasters are in the process of building their infrastructure.And the company’s growth profile has recently been accelerated in thispandemic, with increases in video streaming driving additional demand.Evertz consistently generates high returns on equity, strong free cash flows,and a healthy balance sheet. These factors make it a solid investment formillennials looking for growth as well as safety and income. Evertz iscurrently yielding 3%, and in the past, the company has chosen to returnexcess cash to its shareholders in the form of special dividends.Fool contributor Karen Thomas does not own shares of Evertz Technologies Ltd.

Cleo


Founder/s: Barnaby Hussey-YeoFounded year: 2016Total funding: £44.7MBased out of London, Cleo is a fintech app designed for Gen-Z to assist interms of finance. Last year, the company raised $44 million (approx £33.2million) in Series B funding led by EQT Ventures with participation fromexisting investors Balderton Capital, LocalGlobe, and SBI. Cleo also plans toexpand in the US further, as it continues to make leadership hires in the BayArea. You can check out available positions over here.Image credits: Palo Alto Networks

Palo Alto Networks


Founder/s: Nir Zuk, Rajiv Batra, Yuming Mao, Dave StevensFounded year: 2005Total funding: £50.7MPalo Alto Networks, Inc. is an American multinational cybersecurity companywith headquarters in Santa Clara, California. Its core products are a platformthat includes advanced firewalls and cloud-based offerings that extend thosefirewalls to cover other aspects of security. They’re hiring for multiplepositions in London.Image credits: Trustpilot

Some tips for remote interviews


Talking about how job seekers can ace a remote interview, especially duringcurrent times, Gettrick notes, “Be really clear where your experience andpassion can make a difference. Founders are obsessed by their businesses, andthe people that join them to help realise their dreams are very important. Itreally is personal ! So know the business, research the founders and make sureyou really understand what it’s like to join a startup.”For interviewees, she shares a few tips from her experience, especially forremote interview processes.1. Check that the technology the company uses is working before you join themeeting – and especially your camera. 2. Try to relax and be yourself as much as you can, you are trying to createa connection and a lot of your body language isn’t visible. Smiling a lot, and ensuring eye contact are my two ‘go to’ tips when I ambeing interviewed – and I strongly recommend them both. 3. Show that you have researched the company and the person who isinterviewing you. It can help make a fast connection as you get to know eachother. 4. Follow up with a short email afterwards, thanking the interviewer. Itmakes you stand out, shows your commitment to the role and also keeps youfront of mind.

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