3 The career opportunities are seemingly endless



High Technology Industry


Home to the Silicon Forest, the state’s concentration of High Technologycompanies has made a name for Oregon across the globe. Companies like Intel,Tektronix, and HP have long roots in the region and have spun-off hundreds ofother startups. Today there are 5,465 high tech businesses statewide. Oregon’srobust high tech ecosystem provides a competitive advantage for any growingtechnology company.The largest cluster of Oregon technology companies is located around the cityof Hillsboro, anchored by Intel’s largest facility in the world and supportedby a highly skilled and experienced workforce. Oregon is one of a handful ofstates in the U.S. that specializes in semiconductor manufacturing. Thisbuildup of talent and infrastructure related to Semiconductors and Electronicshas contributed to the development of the fast-growing Software andInformation Technology (IT) industry as well.5,465 Establishments76,754 Employment$10,613,605,935 Exports$125,834 Average Wage

Software & IT


Software and IT is one of the fastest growing industry groups in Oregon, with45% employment growth over the past 10 years. Nearly 5,000 Software and ITbusinesses call Oregon home. Software and IT companies in Oregon specialize inthe areas of design, digital & social media, financial solutions, open source,training, mobile applications, and health care.Software and IT companies are growing in Oregon due to the attractiveness ofthe state to younger workers and the lower cost of doing business herecompared to other west coast Software and IT hubs. The industry has benefittedgreatly from the presence of Semiconductors and Electronics in the state,which has helped supply and attract talented designers and engineers.Data centers are included in Software and IT, and their growth in Oregon hasprovided much needed jobs in rural parts of the state. Oregon has a strongcompetitive advantage for data centers due to its low energy costs andtemperate climate.

Industry Snapshot


2018 Annual DataHigh Technology | Semiconductors & Electronics | Software & IT | Total —|—|—|— Establishments| $ 528 | $ 4,937 | $ 5,465 Employment| $ 42,869 | $ 33,885 | $ 76,754 Location Quotient (Oregon/U.S.)| 2.19 | 0.83 | 1.27 Rural Location Quotient (Rural Oregon/Oregon)| 0.08 | 0.53 | 0.28 Average Wage| $ 132,938 | $ 116,848 | $ 125,834 Exports| $ 10,613,605,935 | N/A | $ 10,613,605,935High Technology Target Industry

High Technology Industry


Home to the Silicon Forest, the state’s concentration of High Technologycompanies has made a name for Oregon across the globe. Companies like Intel,Tektronix, and HP have long roots in the region and have spun-off hundreds ofother startups. Today there are 5,465 high tech businesses statewide. Oregon’srobust high tech ecosystem provides a competitive advantage for any growingtechnology company.The largest cluster of Oregon technology companies is located around the cityof Hillsboro, anchored by Intel’s largest facility in the world and supportedby a highly skilled and experienced workforce. Oregon is one of a handful ofstates in the U.S. that specializes in semiconductor manufacturing. Thisbuildup of talent and infrastructure related to Semiconductors and Electronicshas contributed to the development of the fast-growing Software andInformation Technology (IT) industry as well.5,465 Establishments76,754 Employment$10,613,605,935 Exports$125,834 Average Wage

Software & IT


Software and IT is one of the fastest growing industry groups in Oregon, with45% employment growth over the past 10 years. Nearly 5,000 Software and ITbusinesses call Oregon home. Software and IT companies in Oregon specialize inthe areas of design, digital & social media, financial solutions, open source,training, mobile applications, and health care.Software and IT companies are growing in Oregon due to the attractiveness ofthe state to younger workers and the lower cost of doing business herecompared to other west coast Software and IT hubs. The industry has benefittedgreatly from the presence of Semiconductors and Electronics in the state,which has helped supply and attract talented designers and engineers.Data centers are included in Software and IT, and their growth in Oregon hasprovided much needed jobs in rural parts of the state. Oregon has a strongcompetitive advantage for data centers due to its low energy costs andtemperate climate.

Industry Snapshot


2018 Annual DataHigh Technology | Semiconductors & Electronics | Software & IT | Total —|—|—|— Establishments| $ 528 | $ 4,937 | $ 5,465 Employment| $ 42,869 | $ 33,885 | $ 76,754 Location Quotient (Oregon/U.S.)| 2.19 | 0.83 | 1.27 Rural Location Quotient (Rural Oregon/Oregon)| 0.08 | 0.53 | 0.28 Average Wage| $ 132,938 | $ 116,848 | $ 125,834 Exports| $ 10,613,605,935 | N/A | $ 10,613,605,9352 Reasons Tech Companies Have High P/E RatiosA high price-to-earnings ratio isn’t necessarily a sign of overinflated value.A lot of technology companies have a high P/E ratio and in the long run, thosenumbers make sense. Of course, in some cases they can be a warning flag aswell, so understanding the metric helps you make the best decisions aboutapplying it.In this clip from the Industry Focus: Tech podcast, Motley Fool analysts DylanLewis and Simon Erickson talk about two reasons a company might have a highP/E ratio, and why investors shouldn’t let a high price-to-earnings numberscare them away from an otherwise appealing stock.A transcript follows the video.This podcast was recorded on Jun. 3, 2016.Dylan Lewis: Simon, this being the tech show, we cover an industry with a lotof high-flying P/Es. I thought it would be really awesome to talk about acouple of companies in this space that have illustrated some of the merits ofthis approach: looking at these high P/E companies that have done pretty wellfor investors, and then maybe talk about one that you’re particularly excitedabout now, that’s maybe a little bit under the radar.Simon Erickson: Great.Lewis: I wanted to bring you on the show because I know you focus on tech, andI think that this space is particularly prime for this type of investingapproach. You have a couple of reasons for that.Erickson: Sure. Again, when we’re talking about the E in the P/E ratio, thisdoesn’t account for a lot of things that a lot of tech companies are plowingback into the business, which is decreasing the E, which is inflating the P/Eratio — if I haven’t confused everyone with that analogy there.Lewis: There’s a lot of rhyming and letters going on there.Erickson: It’s companies that are investing more in themselves. The firstreason for that is really kind of cloud-based computing. Companies arespending very heavily on servers and a lot of IT infrastructure for hostingthings in the cloud. More and more software is moving this way. When you spenda lot of money upfront on those servers and infrastructure, you have todepreciate that over time. Depreciation reduces your earnings over time too,so you have less reported earnings in the short term, but a huge benefit overthe longer term.The second thing we’ve really seen in the tech industry, also, is there’s kindof a favor of, or preference of, paying employees, especially developers, instock. Stock-based compensation is an expense which is not a cash expense — alot of these companies are still producing a lot of cash flow — but it doeswork against your earnings too. Companies that pay their employees in stockrather than in cash, that tends to be a lower P/E — I’m sorry, a higher P/E– lower-earnings company that’s still pulling in a lot of cash on thelicenses. So there are two things that particularly pertain to the techindustry for this.Why Should You Consider A Career In Tech Sales? Here Are 6 Reasons Why:If you’re currently exploring your job options, have you given considerationto a tech sales career?If not, there are several reasons why you should give some thought to joiningthe ranks at a software or technology company and using your skills to helpthem continue to grow and make an impact.Why? Well, here’s everything you need to know about why a tech sales career isworth considering.

What is Tech Sales Anyway?


In a tech sales position, you’ll be responsible for connecting consumers(which could be individuals or other businesses) with technology that can helpthem solve a specific problem.Exactly what type of tech you’re selling—from actual hardware to software orother services—will vary depending on the type of company you work for.But, regardless of the specifics, in this customer-facing role the importantthing to know is that you’re tasked with connecting with and educatingpotential customers—and ultimately closing the deal.For some added clarity, you should check out what Ralph Barsi wrote about SDRjob descriptions, and what they’re REALLY telling you.

Tech Sales Job Description Example:


Here’s a look at a tech sales job description example. The below is a postingfor a Sales Development Representative role with Wrike, a project managementsoftware solution:Image Source

6 Reasons to Consider a Tech Sales Career


We know your next question: Why even start a career in tech sales? Well, thereare definitely plenty of benefits that make this a particularly appealingcareer path. Here are four to consider.

1. The demand is high


Considering that sales is quite literally what keeps every company’s doorsopen, it makes sense that there’s a lot of security and demand in this careerfield.But, as technology continues to become even more prevalent in our day-to-daylives, tech companies in particular are aggressively adding people to theirteams who can get their solutions and products in front of a wider audience.A recent study from ToutApp—which surveyed 300 HR managers at U.S.-basedtechnology companies who had at least 200 employees—found that a whopping 80%of respondents stated that they intend to invest more in the recruitment andhiring of sales talent.While others may worry about things like automation or online capabilitiesreplacing the need for their jobs, that’s not the case for sales—where humaninteraction still carries a lot of importance.In fact, research from the Harvard Business Review found that directinteractions with providers influence B2B purchasing decisions more thananything else.Image SourceNeedless to say, demand for tech sales professionals is high (and will likelystay that way). So, it’s an incredibly secure and lucrative path to pursue.

2. The pay is great


Speaking of lucrative, the salary is another big draw for many tech salesprofessionals. While the tech industry is known to pay hefty sums to thepeople who fill the more technical roles, you can earn a great living in salesas well.Bridge Group’s 2015 SaaS Inside Sales Survey Report shared that thecompensation for inside sales roles rose to record highs in 2015.The company discovered an average base salary of $60,000 with average on-target earnings of $118,000—proving that technical roles aren’t the only oneswho earn the big bucks.Image SourceAs this Business Insider roundup demonstrates, numerous sales-relatedpositions make it onto the list of the best-paying non-tech jobs in theindustry.While a paycheck isn’t everything when it comes to your job satisfaction,knowing that a career path in tech sales quite literally pays off makes itsomething that’s definitely worth considering.

3. The career opportunities are seemingly endless


Nobody wants to reach a limit on their own career, and this is another thingthat makes tech sales so appealing: There are seemingly limitlessopportunities for growth and advancement.In fact, many tech leaders got their start in sales—because it’s a great wayto gain familiarity with the business and customers, while also making ameasurable impact on the success of the organization (you need revenue!).So, as you gain more experience and continue to close deals and prove yourworth, you’ll likely experience rapid progression in your career.Take a look at LinkedIn’s data as an example. LinkedIn pulled together a listof the most promising jobs of 2017—the ones with the highest median salaries,strong job openings, and year-over-year growth.Which job appeared third on that list? A sales engineer—proving that pursuinga career in tech sales could mean really bright things for your future.

4. The barrier to entry is low


The tech industry can be intimidating, and can leave many wondering how to getinto software sales with no experience.Fortunately, this is another upside of a career in tech sales: There’s a verylow barrier to entry.“There’s often no formal education and training programs for sales pros; it’ssomething many people discover as a career by accident,” explains SharonFlorentine in an article for CIO.This means these roles are challenging for recruiters to hire for—but, it alsomeans that people with diverse backgrounds and experiences can really make aname for themselves in sales positions.There’s no strict mold you need to fit into or overly formal criteria you needto meet in order to find success as as tech sales professional.

5. Career Security


We all know tech is the future (and the future is now), so as time progressesmore and more “traditional” jobs may be taken over by technological solutionswhich will not surprisingly need salespeople to sell them. Unlike many other industries that are at the whim of a physical good’s supplyand demand cycle, technology, and specifically tech sales, are often rolesthat can be done with little resources and even remotely if needed.Both technology and sales are never going away, so if you are worried aboutyour current industries’ longevity, you won’t need to worry so much with tech.

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